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Interests

My initial research interests focused on the Biomechanics. However, I have made a significant effort over the last 10 years to create opportunities to be involved in multiple projects focusing on other exercise science and health-related issues (e.g., wide range of symptomatic populations, education and health professionals).

Biomechanics of individuals with lower limb loss (Protamine project)

My research activities aim at developing biomechanical tools and improving basic knowledge of the locomotion of individuals with lower limb loss fitted with a socket or an osseointegrated fixation during key stages of the rehabilitation and activities of daily living.

In particular, my current work on the load applied on the residuum of individuals with transfemoral amputation has provided innovative tools for an evidence-based:

  • Rehabilitation of individual with lower limb amputation,
  • Fitting of the prosthesis,
  • Design of conventional prosthetic components:
    • E.g., sockets, knees, feet
  • Design of components for direct skeletal anchorage
    • E.g., implants, abutments, shock absorbers

To know more: http://www.laurentfrossard.com/leader/biomechanics-of-individuals-with-limb-loss

Biomechanics of athletes with a disability (Parashot project)

My research activities aim at developing biomechanical tools and improving basic knowledge of the performance of athletes with a disability (i.e., stationary throwers) in motion analysis laboratory as well as during training sessions and competitions (e.g., National Championships, World Championships, Paralympic Games).

This research has a direct impact on the training of Australian elite athletes and more particularly on:

  • The strength and fitness programs,
  • The throwing technique,
  • The design of the throwing frames.

This work also contributes to improving the fairness of the throwing events by:

  • Participating to video refereeing during world class events
  • Providing the classifiers, who assigned each athlete to a class, with the true functional ability of a given competitor.

To know more: http://www.laurentfrossard.com/leader/biomechanics-of-athletes-with-a-disability

Involvements in development of instrumentation

  • Tools for evidence-based care of individual with lower limb loss. Since 2000, I have led the development of several portable kinetic recording systems enabling to collect the load applied on the residuum during rehabilitation and activities of daily living. This work has been extensively published. These developments are conducted in the framework of the Protamine project.
  • Tools for evidence-based classification of Parkinson’s disease. My involvement in this research is to look at the validity and reliability of markerless motion tracking systems that could be used by neurologists to detect and analyze motor symptoms, also called Exo-Imaging Test (EIT). This work is conducted in collaboration with other colleagues within UQAM and other institutions in Canada (e.g., Duval C, Sadikot A, Carignan B, Daneault JF).
  • Tools for evidence-based treatment in chiropractic. My involvement in this research is to look at the validity and reliability of instruments used by chiropractors to determine spine stiffness. This activity is conducted in collaboration with other colleagues within UQAM (e.g., Roy R, Boucher J, Comtois A).
  • Setup of gait laboratory equipment. My arrival in several organizations (e.g., QUT UQAM, CRME) has coincided with the setting of new motion analysis laboratories (e.g., gait, performance analysis). In particular, I have been in involved in fitting these laboratories with force-plates and tridimensional motion analysis systems.
  • Development of portable motion sensors with the industry partner Neopraxis Pty Ltd in the framework of a QUT strategic Link grant and an ARC Linkage grant ($255,000 for 3 years, 2003).

Involvements with other symptomatic populations

  • Individuals with cerebral palsy. The vast majority of athletes competing in the F30s classes suffers from cerebral palsy. My involvement with this population consists in determining the functional level of these athletes and the benefits of throwing equipment. This work is conducted in the framework of the Parashot project.
  • Individuals with spinal cord injury. The vast majority of athletes competing in the F50s classes have had a spinal cord injury following a trauma. My involvement with this population focus mainly on establishing the functional level of these athletes and the benefits of throwing equipment. This work is conducted in the framework of the Parashot project.
  • Individuals with upper limb amputation. My involvement in this research is to look at interlimb transfer of unimanual grasping movement in individuals with upper limb amputation. This work is conducted in collaboration with other colleagues within UQAM and other institutions in Canada (e.g., Allami N, Frack V).
  • Individuals wearing orthotics. My involvement in this research was to look at rocker sole shapes for rigid ankle foot orthoses. This project was led by other colleagues in Australia (e.g., Sirotic N, Bach T, Jarrott T, McKay S).
  • Individuals with Parkinson’s disease. My involvement in this research is to look at automatic detection and assessment of motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease with a focus on dyskinesia. This work is conducted in collaboration with other colleagues within UQAM and other institutions in Canada (e.g., Duval C, Sadikot A, Carignan B).

Medical education

Education of health professionals. Between 2007 and 2010, I have been focusing on education of health professionals as the responsible of the Research and Development of PrimEd. Some of this work has been published in eJMA and presented in conferences.


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